le mal du siècle

flâneuse

ABOUT || ASK || TAGS

hismarmorealcalm:

Rome Capitoline Museum Busts of Emperors  c. 1890  Alinari & Cook albumen silver print

hismarmorealcalm:

Rome Capitoline Museum Busts of Emperors  c. 1890  Alinari & Cook albumen silver print

(via last-of-the-romans)

indigoasmodel:


Female police officers, London, 1919

indigoasmodel:

Female police officers, London, 1919

(via beautifulcentury)

ancientpeoples:

Head of a Roman Youth
AD 140-170
Roman Imperial
This strikingly handsome and sensitive portrait head in the plastic Hadrianic-Antonine style of the mid-2nd century A.D. is similar to a portrait of the young Marcus Aurelius in the Capitoline Museum, Rome. It may represent a prince of the imperial family, one of the children of Antoninus Pius.
Source: Dallas Museum of Art

ancientpeoples:

Head of a Roman Youth

AD 140-170

Roman Imperial

This strikingly handsome and sensitive portrait head in the plastic Hadrianic-Antonine style of the mid-2nd century A.D. is similar to a portrait of the young Marcus Aurelius in the Capitoline Museum, Rome. It may represent a prince of the imperial family, one of the children of Antoninus Pius.

Source: Dallas Museum of Art

(via last-of-the-romans)

(Source: cosmosonic, via paskis)

debourbon:

Olga Spessivtseva and Serge Lifar in La Chatte

“I have been to the Russian ballet,” Alabama tried to explain herself, “and it seemed to me—Oh, I don’t know! As if it held all the things I’ve always tried to find in everything else.”
“What have you seen?”
“La Chatte, Madame, I must do that some day!” Alabama replied impulsively.
A faint flicker of intrigued interest moved the black eyes recessionally. Then the personality withdrew from the face. Looking into her eyes was like walking through a long stone tunnel with a grey light shining at the other end, sloshing blindly through dank dripping earth over a moist curving bottom.
“You are too old. It is a beautiful ballet. Why have you come to me so late?”
“I didn’t know before. I was too busy living.”
“And now you have done all your living?”
“Enough to be fed up,” laughed Alabama.
Zelda Fitzgerald, Save me the Waltz

debourbon:

Olga Spessivtseva and Serge Lifar in La Chatte

“I have been to the Russian ballet,” Alabama tried to explain herself, “and it seemed to me—Oh, I don’t know! As if it held all the things I’ve always tried to find in everything else.”

“What have you seen?”

“La Chatte, Madame, I must do that some day!” Alabama replied impulsively.

A faint flicker of intrigued interest moved the black eyes recessionally. Then the personality withdrew from the face. Looking into her eyes was like walking through a long stone tunnel with a grey light shining at the other end, sloshing blindly through dank dripping earth over a moist curving bottom.

“You are too old. It is a beautiful ballet. Why have you come to me so late?”

“I didn’t know before. I was too busy living.”

“And now you have done all your living?”

“Enough to be fed up,” laughed Alabama.

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save me the Waltz

criminallyinnocent:

Userhat and Wife Receiving Offerings, Tomb of Userhat

criminallyinnocent:

Userhat and Wife Receiving Offerings, Tomb of Userhat

(via last-of-the-romans)

fripperiesandfobs:

Worth evening dress, 1898-1900

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via roseofpicardy)

irefiordiligi:

Isis Ritual Ceremony - Roman fresco from Herculaneum

(via last-of-the-romans)

snow-white-lindemann:

The Sorrows of Young Werther - Goethe :)

snow-white-lindemann:

The Sorrows of Young Werther - Goethe :)

(via ablogwithaview)

fawnvelveteen:

Cafe in Paris

fawnvelveteen:

Cafe in Paris

(via labelleotero)

edit: thank you for your answers!

Read More

a-l-ancien-regime:

Eugène Atget, Trianon, 1923-24

a-l-ancien-regime:

Eugène Atget, Trianon, 1923-24

(via rosesandraphael)


Le coup au cœur, René Magritte, 1952.

Le coup au cœur, René Magritte, 1952.

(Source: worker-and-parasite, via meiringens)

feuille-d-automne:

Salon de thé chez Fauchon. Paris, 1910.
© Maurice-Louis Branger / Roger-Viollet

feuille-d-automne:

Salon de thé chez Fauchon. Paris, 1910.

© Maurice-Louis Branger / Roger-Viollet